Prepared to Teach Online? Perspectives of Faculty in the University of North Carolina System

Lysa Kosak
Dionna Manning
Ellen Dobson
Lisa Rogerson
Shannon Cotnam
Susan Colaric
Cheryl McFadden

Abstract

The prevalence of online distance education courses requires university faculty to face new challenges and make new decisions in the areas of course management and design, delivery method, student communication media, creation of an engaging learning environment, assessment , and use of new technologies. The purpose of this study was to ascertain if university faculty in the University of North Carolina System are receiving sufficient training and support in developing an online distance education curriculum. There was also an interest in the types and amount of training the faculty received at various institutions as well as their attitudes toward developing curriculum for online learning. An online survey was employed to solicit data from faculty of the schools and departments of education (SCDEs) within the University of North Carolina System who have previously taught online courses. The survey addressed the experience of respondents, types of on and off-campus training offered, topics offered in training, relevancy of offerings, whether or not training was required prior to course delivery, and requested ideas for staff development that were desired but unavailable. The majority of respondents indicated that there was sufficient training for faculty to support the change to online learning. Respondents also indicated that most training was offered on-campus, was predominately related to pedagogical and technical areas, was viewed as relevant and accessible, and participation was voluntary or not required. Faculty attitudes, according to results, were overall positive about the quality and quantity of training for course development and maintenance for online learning environments.

Keywords

Faculty, Online teaching, Preparedness

Annotation

The purpose of this study was to discern if university faculty were receiving sufficient training and support in developing an online curriculum. There was also interest in the types and amount of training the faculty received at various institutions as well as their attitudes towards developing curriculum for online learning. Finally, the timeliness of available training was of interest.

About the Study

Links to Article
Mode
Publication Type Journal Article
In Publication
Type of Research
Research Design
Intervention/Areas of Study
Level of Analysis
Specific Populations Examined
Peer-Reviewed
Specific Institutional Characteristics of Interest 4-year Institution
Specific Course or Program Characteristics
Outcome Variables of Interest
Student Sample Size
Citing Articles


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