No Significant Difference

About the Database

The No Significant Difference database was first established in 2004 as a companion piece to Thomas L. Russell's book, "The No Significant Difference Phenomenon" (2001, IDECC, fifth edition), a fully indexed, comprehensive research bibliography of 355 research reports, summaries and papers that document no significant differences (NSD) in student outcomes between alternate modes of education delivery.  Redesigned in 2010 and provided as a service of WCET, (WICHE Cooperative for Educational Technologies), a division of the Western Interstate Commission for Higher Education, the database was designed to expand the offerings from the book by providing access to appropriate studies published or discovered after its publication.

 

This site is intended to function as an ever-growing repository of comparative media studies in education research. Both no significant differences (NSD) and significant differences (SD) studies are constantly being solicited for inclusion in the website. In addition to studies that document no significant difference (NSD), the website includes studies which do document significant differences (SD) in student outcomes based on the mode of education delivery.

 

 

Contribute to the Collection

In its new home on the DETA Research website, the database is intended to continue to function as an ever-growing repository of comparative media studies in education research. The current collection is in need of both updates to the current records, as well as the addition of current and emerging research.  As such, both NSD and SD studies are constantly being solicited for inclusion in the website.  If you are interested in assisting as a contributor or editor, contact us.

Records: 210

Do Online Students Perform as Well as Lecture Students?

2001

J. Dutton

M. Dutton

J. Perry

Excerpt

These results demonstrate that online students can perform at least as well as traditional students. They do not show that any student, randomly selected, can do as well in an online class. Undoubtedly self-selection means that students with greater computer skills and /or greater maturity are more likely to opt for an online course. However we have reduced the effects of those factors in this study. The subject matter of the course reduces variability in computer skills in this case. And in the . . . emperical work we have controlled for maturity differences to the extent we could. So our results provide support for further development of online course delivery.

Finding

No Significant Difference

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Improvement of Teaching by Television: Current Status of the Texas Educational Microwave Project

1964

H. Greene

Excerpt

TEMP courses are as effective as face-to-face teaching. Even faculty members who may have objections to television for other reasons acknowledge this.

Finding

No Significant Difference

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