Student Motivation to Learn via Computer Conferencing

Eva Bures
Philip Abrami
Cheryl Amundsen

Abstract

This study investigates why some university students appear motivated to learn via computer conferencing (CC) whereas others do not, exploring the correlations of three key aspects of student motivation - reasons for engaging in academic learning (goal orientation), beliefs that they can acquire the ability to use CC (self-efficacy), and beliefs that learning to use CC will help them learn the course material (outcome
expectations) - with satisfaction and with the frequency of CC contributions. Participants (n = 79) came from 4 graduate-level face-to-face courses and 1 undergraduate DE course. The results suggest that students who believe that CC will help them learn the course material are more likely to express satisfaction and to be active online, that students who believe that they are capable of learning how to use CC are more likely to be active online, and that students who are concerned about their relative performance compared to others tend to send fewer messages to conferences where online activity is not graded. Practical implications for instructors and suggestions for future research are described.

Keywords

Annotation

Creates a model that explains why some students who have the skills and knowledge necessary to succeed online do not.
Factors include: goal orientation, outcome expectations, success expectations.
Hypothesis:
1 . Students who have high CC success expectations will tend to report higher
satisfaction with CC and will send in more on-line messages overall.
2. Students who have high CC outcome expectations will tend to report higher
satisfaction with CC and will send in more online messages overall.
3. Students in courses where CC is not graded or allocated marks only as part
of a participation mark will tend to send in fewer messages and to report
lower satisfaction with CC than in courses where specific CC activities are
graded.
4. Students with higher mastery orientation will tend to contribute more messages than will students with lower mastery orientation, especially to conferences where online activity is not graded. As well, they will tend to be more
satisfied with the use of CC as a learning tool.
5. Students with higher performance orientation will tend to contribute fewer
messages overall, in particular to conferences where on-line activity is not
graded, and to report lower satisfaction with the use of CC as a learning tool
than will students with lower performance orientation.

APA Citation

Bures, E. M., Abrami, P. C., & Amundsen, C. (2000). Student motivation to learn via computer conferencing. Research in higher Education, 41(5), 593-621.

About the Study

Links to Article https://scholar.google.com/scholar?hl=en&as_sdt=0%2C50&q=student+motivation+to+learn+via+computer-conferencing&btnG=
http://www.jstor.org/stable/pdf/40196404.pdf?casa_token=0uDgzl9r73gAAAAA:8wIG8xEIDTc1KRSvpI-YwY1Zy9v__Wk6ZM5jiJv35qX7bzD95PdZ024sSdRrNFtU6YWQPq-06pqWb_jV4Qajf6-4rGXqwZ2FKn8V20TmQfk2M979OXQz
Mode Online
Publication Type Journal Article
In Publication Research in Higher Education
Type of Research Quantitative
Research Design Survey research (qualitative or quantitative)
Intervention/Areas of Study Student motivation
Level of Analysis Student-level
Specific Populations Examined Graduates
Peer-Reviewed Yes
Specific Institutional Characteristics of Interest 4-year Institution
Specific Course or Program Characteristics
Outcome Variables of Interest Academic achievement or performance, including assessment scores and course grades
Student Sample Size 0-99
Citing Articles https://scholar.google.com/scholar?cites=11652613798024517732&as_sdt=5,50&sciodt=0,50&hl=en


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