Delivering Graduate Marketing Education: An analysis of face-to-face versus distance education

T. G. Ponzurick
K. R. France
C. M. Logar

Abstract

Marking education may be delivered through a number of different methods from face-to-face to distance education. This study analyzes MBA student perceptions and preferences with regard to face-to-face versus distance education methods for delivering a course in marketing management. The results indicate that consistent course structure can be developed across delivery formats buy that some pedagogical adjustments may be required for the distance education format, particularly in the areas of class participation and course-related activities. The findings also show that students appear to select the distance education delivery method because of convenience, not quality, since distance education was found to be the least effective and least satisfying method of delivery for the students studied. The study concludes by discussing the implication of these results.

Keywords

Annotation

This study looks at MBA students’ attitudes and perceptions of distance education courses compared to traditional face-to-face classes. While class structure and course design can be nearly identical for both traditional and distance courses, the authors find that some pedagogical changes need to be made in order to help distance students have meaningful experiences in discussion and classroom participation.

APA Citation

Ponzurick, T. G., France, K. R., & Logar, C. M. (2000). Delivering graduate marketing education: An analysis of face-to-face versus distance education. Journal of marketing education, 22(3), 180-187.

About the Study

Links to Article https://scholar.google.com/scholar?hl=en&as_sdt=0%2C50&q=Delivering+graduate+marketing+education%3A&btnG=
Mode Technology-enhanced, Blended or Hybrid
Publication Type Journal Article
In Publication Journal of Marketing Education
Type of Research Quantitative
Research Design Action research
Intervention/Areas of Study Course design, Digital lecture, Engagement, Instructor-student interactions, Multimedia
Level of Analysis Student-level, Instructor-level, Course-level
Specific Populations Examined Graduates
Peer-Reviewed Yes
Specific Institutional Characteristics of Interest
Specific Course or Program Characteristics Professions
Outcome Variables of Interest Academic achievement or performance, including assessment scores and course grades, Learning effectiveness, Satisfaction
Student Sample Size 100-199
Citing Articles https://scholar.google.com/scholar?cites=10487251643255701998&as_sdt=5,50&sciodt=0,50&hl=en


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